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Malwarebytes makes appearance on The Office

I like to have background noise as I answer work e-mails. Typically, I leave Netflix streaming and every so often I glance at the television. While watching The Office, I noticed something very interesting.

Malwarebytes on The Office

If you look at the bottom right corner of the screen, on the monitor, you’ll see Malwarebytes Anti-Malware installed on the computer of a customer that Michael, Dwight, and Jim go to see. Turns out this isn’t the first time we’ve “appeared” on the show. We’ve also shown up on Darryl Philbin’s computer — look at the top left of the screen.

Malwarebytes Anti-Malware is so good, even Dunder Mifflin uses it!

Post other sightings of Malwarebytes in odd places and I’ll talk with the team and do a giveaway to the best one!

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Malwarebytes launches enterprise edition

Forgive my absence, I’ve been chained to a headset on several press calls per day for the last few weeks. Now that the press tour is basically over, I’m able to happily announce the launch of an exciting new product, Malwarebytes Enterprise Edition. This thing is awesome. Seriously.

So much work has gone into this product and I’m excited to finally announce it.

I’m working on some really cool changes to the blog and content that I will hopefully post every week, so stay tuned!

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FCC to help protect your mobile privacy

On my way to Prague last month, I decided to pick up May’s print volume of PC Today. Coincidentally, the entire volume was focused on security.

The first article that caught my attention was about the Federal Communications Commission’s plans to help the victims of phone theft. The article goes on to say, “… when a given phone is reported stolen, wireless carriers can remotely shut down that phone.” What does this mean for you, the consumer?

First of all, the FCC is attempting to protect victims of data and identity theft. However, more than likely your data will be long retrieved by the time you notice your phone is stolen and call the wireless provider.

Secondly, the article cites the FCC’s statistic that 40% of New York City robberies are that of mobile phones. However, I doubt that the majority of those were for the purpose of data theft but rather for the theft of the hardware itself.

If you’re concerned about the data and identity theft aspect of losing your phone, you can take several steps to mitigate that risk:

  1. Don’t store sensitive data on your phone. This is pretty common sense. You wouldn’t want your credit card information easily accessible, but who stores that on their phone anyway? What’s more common is saving e-mail passwords and allowing the thief to gain easy access to your personal, or even more sensitive corporate e-mails.
  2. Another layer of passwords, such as locking access to your phone with a 4 digit number, is another excellent way to deter thieves.
  3. Use the software that comes with your phone. Instead of relying on the wireless carrier to deactivate the phone, or even to support the feature, use software that is prepackaged. For example, Apple’s iPhone comes with a nifty feature called Find My iPhone that can help you erase all of the data remotely. The article did not specify whether the FCC was going to require this for all wireless carriers.

In the digital age of today, our eyes are glued to our mobile phones. Don’t become a victim of mobile theft and make sure to have that phone glued to your side.

How else do you think the FCC can help?

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Holy spam, Batman!

As I arrived in London this morning I opened up my phone’s e-mail client and saw upwards of 1,000 e-mails downloading. At first, I had no idea what was going on, but then I realized they all had the same subject, “Please stop supporting the New York Times traitorous propaganda.” Spam, and lots of it. They are still coming in at one per minute.

Image of a sample e-mail attached. Anybody else getting these?

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Malwarebytes brand exploited through search

It’s not often that I search for the term Malwarebytes on Google. I know how to get to my own company’s website by typing it into the address bar. However, when a friend or family member asks me how to get to our website, I almost always instruct them to search.

Unfortunately, there exists a market where bad people benefit by preying on our users. They create websites which advertise that they distribute Malwarebytes and instead, download a product of their own onto our user’s machine. They advertise on Google and turn up in search results. I’d equate this to a cereal company packaging their generic, less delicious brand into a Cheerios box and putting it on shelves.

If you see a page like this, it is fraudulent and you should go directly to www.malwarebytes.org instead.

It makes me sick, and I refuse to let it go on. Today, I instructed our legal team to pursue all of these cheaters in hopes that we can wipe them from the face of the Internet.

But that’s not all. How far is too far? Should advertisers on Google be allowed to use company names as keywords? If I search for Cheerios, should the first advertisement be for the generic brand? It’s allowed, a common practice, and in my opinion completely unethical.

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California looks to fight cybercrime

In August, the state of California created the nation’s largest e-crime unit, “a group of 20 investigators and prosecutors whose sole mission will be to thwart and prosecute cybercrimes like identity theft, Internet scams, computer theft, online child pornography and intellectual property theft across the state.” (source)

While this all sounds fantastic, I strongly doubt a team of 20 investigators can handle the amount of fraud, identity theft, and even such a broad category such as Internet scams which include malicious software. I wonder how closely this e-crime unit will work with reputable companies in the security industry to help find these criminals.